HBO Series DEADWOOD Continues to Bring New Visitors to the Black Hills

The success of the colorful history-based series has also lead to a boom in Internet traffic and other requests for information about the Black Hills and Deadwood and its rowdy past. Curiosity about historic Deadwood legends Seth Bullock, Sol Star, Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane Cannary, Jack McCall, Al Swearengen, Charlie Utter, Preacher Smith, the Chinese community, and Mt Moriah Cemetery has kept staffs at the Adams Museum and Deadwood CVB busy responding to history and tourism questions. Another character in the city at the time was legendary lawman Wyatt Earp, with Gerald McRaney as mining magnate George Hearst, and Emmy award winner Brian Cox portraying Jack Langrishe, a real-life Deadwood theater owner and producer.

If you are looking for more information about gold mining in the Black Hills, George Hearst, or the Homestake Gold Mine you are in luck! Go to our featured articles and historical biographies sections to learn more about these nuggets of Black Hills history and the Homestake Underground Lab Project.

 

HBO’s “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee” debuts in Rapid City; Brings Eastman Story to the Small Screen

HBO Productions has once again visited the tumultuous history of the Black Hills in the late 1800s with the film “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.” The film’s basis was the award-winning book of the same name by Dee Brown. While not completely accurate in an historical sense, the film’s story revolves around the life of Dr. Charles A. Eastman. In this film, the character of Eastman is portrayed by actor Adam Beach.

 

PBS revisits 1973 Wounded Knee occupation

On the night of February 27, 1973, fifty-four cars rolled, horns blaring, into a small hamlet on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota. Within hours, some 200 Oglala Lakota and American Indian Movement (AIM) activists had seized the few major buildings in town and police had cordoned off the area. The occupation of Wounded Knee had begun.

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